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Podcast

Episode 131: How To Generate More Income In Your Business with Corporate Clients with Liz J. Simpson

Apr 08, 2021

In today’s episode, we meet Liz J. Simpson, founder of the Big Money Movement, an executive coach that empowers women experts and entrepreneurs to land higher-paying corporate clients.

Liz is passionate about shattering the revenue disparity facing women and helping them secure larger deals for their business.

If you’re wondering how to start working with corporate clients that pay big money, listen up. During our conversation, we talk about creating proximity to your ideal buyer, having consistent revenue streams, finding your niche in the marketplace, why selling is a key component to running a business, and how to create traction and overflow in our business. 

Listen on Apple Podcast

You’ll learn:

  • How to shatter the revenue disparity rate for women
  • Four phases of the Big Money Movement transformation
  • The biggest hindrance to female founders moving from single to corporate clients
  • How to create proximity to your ideal buyer
  • Tools, processes, and systems to build your professional clientele

Mentioned in this episode:

Instagram: @lizjsimpson
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lizjsimpson/

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Episode Transcript

Liz J. Simpson

No conversations, no cash. When we're talking about corporate buyers, you have to have some type of conversation to get the deal. The key where most people drop the ball is in what we call discovery conversations, because when they finally have a conversation with an executive, they're concerned about what they need to say, or they're trying to prove themselves.

Liz J. Simpson

And so I always tell my clients, if you're focused on what to say, you're doing discovery conversations wrong. You should be focused on what to ask.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Hi, Off-Scripters. It's your host, Serwaa Adjei-Pellé and welcome to Episode 1 31 of the She's Off Script podcast. This is a show where we hear and learn from women who have created unique blueprints for their business success.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

My hope is that you'll hear their stories and translate their gems into a unique path for yourself.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

In today's episode, we meet Liz J. Simpson, who is the founder of the big money Movement and consulting agency. Stimulus. Liz runs a sales accelerator that empowers women experts to secure five and six bigger corporate contracts. And as founder of Stimulus, Liz has helped clients close millions of dollars in business through her proprietary digital sales strategies. During our conversation, Liz teaches us how to build relationships with corporate decision-makers out of position, our businesses as experts in the space, the cadence with which we should reach out to prospects before going in for the ask, how to lead, winning discovery calls and so much more

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

before we hear the rest of Liz's episode, I would love it if you can subscribe, rate and review our show on iTunes or anywhere you listen to podcasts. This will help to spread the word about our show. So amazing stories like it is is can continue to inspire women looking to launch their own Off-Scripters journeys.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

The She's Off Script podcast also has a membership community to help you launch and grow your business with resources and coaching. Join our She's Off Script community today by going to Serwaa Adjei-Pellé dot com. Forward slash community

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

With that, let's go off script with the founder of the big money movement and digital sales expert Liz J. Simpson.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Liz J. Simpson.

Liz J. Simpson

Welcome to She's Off Script. Thank you for being here.

Liz J. Simpson

Oh, it is an honor. Thank you so much for having me, sir. Well,

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

you online?

Liz J. Simpson

Could you share who you

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

are and what

Liz J. Simpson

you do? Yes. So I'm the founder of the big money movement,

Liz J. Simpson

and I am power women experts and entrepreneurs to land higher paying corporate clients. So I'm all about shattering the revenue disparity facing women and helping them secure larger deals for their business.

Liz J. Simpson

So

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

listen, learning about you. I read that at age 30. You seem to have it all. You have the big house, six figure salary husband. But in your words, you felt like you had worked so hard to prove yourself to people that you had completely betrayed yourself. So what brought you to that crossroads and realization in your journey?

Liz J. Simpson

Yes. I guess it's the quarter life crisis that a lot of millennials complain about. But for me, I just realized I betrayed myself in in the means that I thought success once one size fits. All right. I thought if I have the things if I check the boxes, then of course, that will mean fulfillment. And so

Liz J. Simpson

I just realized Okay, I've checked the boxes, but

Liz J. Simpson

I don't really know who I am right now. I haven't been reintroduced to this woman. This woman is not fulfilled. And we haven't taken the time to figure out how to actualize who she is. And so for me, I just realized I have the things

Liz J. Simpson

I'm at the top of someone's mountain, but it's not mine. So I need to figure out how to reassess and redefine what success means for me.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

So then that brought you to the point where you're working with women to help us shatter the revenue disparity. So what is that revenue disparity to date, and how are you helping us shatter it?

Liz J. Simpson

Absolutely. So if we look at women owned businesses versus male owned firms,

Liz J. Simpson

men average 67% more revenue than women. So it's

Liz J. Simpson

if you look at it. You know, that's if a woman owned businesses is averaging $100,000 a male owned businesses averaging 367% more than that, right? So that's one part of the revenue disparity. But as a black woman, if we look deeper, the statistics are even more frightening. So, for instance, if we look at Latina women owned businesses, they average only $51,000 per year, and if we look at black woman owned firms, they average only $24,000 per year. And so one of the big things with the big money movement is the idea of we're creating revenue that's bigger than ourselves, right? So it's

Liz J. Simpson

about creating overflow in our businesses so that we can give from a place of abundance instead of scarcity, which a lot of times when I think about like the black community and black churches, I think of some of the most generous people in my life having so little. But there's a difference between giving from sacrificing giving from abundance, which is what I want us to embrace. And so a big part of the big money movement is realizing that, you know, small money is what we called settling like, You know, survival is selfish, right?

Liz J. Simpson

Feeling like I'm doing good enough is selfish, because

Liz J. Simpson

if I had a capacity for overflow or abundance I could give to causes that I care about, I could create jobs in my communities. I could create social change. So a lot of these things, especially now with this heightened sense of the past year, a lot of these things that we feel passionate about doing

Liz J. Simpson

small businesses and capital is a great vehicle to do that when we as minority women, have the tools, resources and ability to do so. So that's all about that's the work that I do is focusing on that.

Liz J. Simpson

Okay, could you paint

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

a picture for us of what the female founders you work with look like when you first start working with them

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

versus after they've gone through the transformation of the big money movement? What are some of the outcomes that you're seeing?

Liz J. Simpson

So yes, definitely. So our work is all about helping them land corporate clients. If we look at the majority of women owned firms that have achieved a million dollars or more in revenue, we notice that over 60% of those businesses are working with corporate clients. So you know you might work with an individual client and say your average deal size is $1000 offering,

Liz J. Simpson

but when you work with the corporate client, then your average deal size becomes $165,000. So most businesses, when they start out, have this inconsistent revenue season right there trying to create traction, and so whether you decide to stay in entrepreneurship or not, if you can land a corporate client that's worth $50,000. That gives you enough cash flow to move differently in your business, which is what our goal is. So to answer your question about where they are, we look at it as four different phases right and which is common in the start up world. There's the ideation phase, which is

Liz J. Simpson

I'm thinking about business and I have an idea. I'm inspired, but I really haven't done anything. You know about this idea yet.

Liz J. Simpson

And then there's the market fit phase and the market fit phases, you know? Okay, I've taken this idea and now I've started to mold who that ideal buyer is, what their needs are, what the problems they need solved and how I could then create a solution for it.

Liz J. Simpson

And I'm starting to offer this solution to my ideal buyer to see if they actually want it. Are they willing to buy it right? And you know, you've passed the market fit phase when people are paying for the solution right there, showing you proof, and then after market fit, there's the traction stage, and that's where most of our clients come to us, right the traction phases. I've landed a client or two, but I'm throwing spaghetti at a wall, right? I've had a word of mouth referral drop in my lap. And so I know people want this, but you know, I might land a client in March, and then there's crickets for three months and I can't live like this. I need to know how to create consistency

Liz J. Simpson

in the final stages. Scale up. And so the scale of the problem is more. We're getting consistent clients. We have some idea what we're doing, but I can't do this by myself. And I need to figure out how to grow a team to those are the four phases. Oftentimes we are educating to help with the ideation and market fit phases.

Liz J. Simpson

But to get past traction and scale up, that takes more hands on coaching. So those are the four phases, I would say, and they

Liz J. Simpson

women are in all different areas when they come to us.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

In your experience, what would you say is the biggest hindrance to female founders moving from single clients to corporate clients?

Liz J. Simpson

Belief.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Because,

Liz J. Simpson

like if you can come out the box doing it like I mean, it's very simple. We talk about this all the time in my programs. It's simple.

Liz J. Simpson

What I love about corporate clients is it's not, as

Liz J. Simpson

people make emotional, decide decisions that they justify with logic. There's always emotion in the buying process. But corporate is less emotional from the standpoint of in corporate.

Liz J. Simpson

They know they have a business problem.

Liz J. Simpson

They're looking for a solution. They create a budget for it.

Liz J. Simpson

And oftentimes the person who gets that contract is who has proximity to the buyer and who proves that, Hey, I can come in. I can solve this problem. I'm not going to embarrass you. I'm gonna do what I said I'm going to do. That's what I hear from executives all the time. I just want people to do what they say they're going to do, and I want to trust that if I hire them, they're not going to embarrass me.

Liz J. Simpson

And so I think a lot of times we create this belief that we have to baby step, which is a pet peeve of mine, because you don't have to baby step. You have to have expertise. You have to solve a problem. You need to gain access to a buyer who has that problem and then secure the contract. So I have clients who are still in corporate. They're parallel preneurs, if we will, who are landing corporate clients.

Liz J. Simpson

We have clients who have online courses or solutions that are more for the consumer market,

Liz J. Simpson

who are now offering that same solution to the corporate market. So the answer is, whenever you decide you want to, the opportunity exists.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

That's so good to know that you don't have to do the whole let me test with small clients before I go big time. You can start right out of the gate. So now let's get into the how

Liz J. Simpson

to. So

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

you mentioned that first, you need proximity to the buyer. So how does one create that proximity?

Liz J. Simpson

Yeah, there's so many different ways, right? And when we work with clients, you have to be true to you. I'm all about self awareness, so you know a great way to gain proximity is speaking right. So if I speak at a stage, it's something about being the person holding the mic in the front of the room that just creates its like a magic act that people are like, Oh, you're someone I should listen to. So

Liz J. Simpson

speaking is a really powerful way, and speaking can be virtual or in person, right? So being featured a place that's a great way, assuming that your strategic for where you speak if you're speaking somewhere where corporate executive fires aren't there, that it's all for not but speaking as a strategic way, leveraging your existing network, I tell people

Liz J. Simpson

one of the first things that we do is identify who's in your network right now. Who is

Liz J. Simpson

in the role of your ideal buyer, who they have proximity to your ideal buyer, and they can do strategic introductions. And also, sometimes you just got to take control and introduce yourself right as a value creator. If there's someone that you want to have proximity to and there's no one in your network to help you,

Liz J. Simpson

then find a way to give value. Like Bob Berg has the go-getter mentality, right? And Stephen Kobe talks about relationships and how you need to make deposits before you make withdrawals. And so the great thing is, if you understand the status quo of a buyer, if you understand what their problems are,

Liz J. Simpson

and you can create value or an immediate win for them, then you can just go introduce yourself to them and provide value as well.

Liz J. Simpson

LinkedIn is a great place to do that. That's my little plug for Lincoln.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

You know, one of the statistics I've seen you put out there that I love is that visible experts get paid a certain percentage more than others. What is that statistic?

Liz J. Simpson

13 times more?

Liz J. Simpson

It's crazy, Yes, So corporate executives are willing to pay up to 13 times more for the services of a highly visible expert. So it's about how do you position yourself in order to become the go to expert?

Liz J. Simpson

A big part of that is positioning, right? You can't be all things to all people, which is a pet peeve of mine, because digital, if ever there was a space for the generalist digital is disrupting it. Because if we look at buyer behaviors, people have very focused searches, right? So if I go to Google

Liz J. Simpson

and I'm looking for an expert, I'm going to say I need help with strategic planning for my small marketing firm. And so if you are not focused on the in the industry, a segment of problem. You're going to be drowned out in the marketplace. But

Liz J. Simpson

if I am, for instance, the VP of marketing for medium sized startup in the retail space that is focused on, you know, sustainable products and you are positioned is that I'm going to think you are the only person like you understand my world. You understand what we're passionate about. You fit in our culture. So now is the time to leverage all of those unique qualities and things that we're passionate about and really need ourselves in the marketplace.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

So first was proximity. Then positioning rightness

Liz J. Simpson

lead us towards. The big

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

venal is

Liz J. Simpson

so funny. I had a client who's like listen, even your systems have systems. I'm like my frameworks that have frameworks. That's what you need.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

You need to sell the framework.

Liz J. Simpson

Thank you. Thank you. Yes, you do. That's what we need to focus on. So

Liz J. Simpson

once you have the positioning, then it's about optimizing your digital footprint. And so what that means is making sure that wherever your buyer interacts with you, they're seeing that consistent, cohesive messaging because consistency builds trust. So

Liz J. Simpson

you want to think about where your buyer might interact with you. So if that's your website, if that's your linked in profile, if that's a podcast, you want to make sure that that messaging and that niche messaging is focused and consistent each place. Then from there we go into side of a framework. It's called prospects only care about outcomes. Prospects only care about outcomes,

Liz J. Simpson

and those letters stand for different things. So the P is actually positioning. The always optimization. The sea is cadence.

Liz J. Simpson

The A is authority in the O is offline strategy, right? I know it's hard to see visually without it shown up, but so after you've optimized and you go into cadence and cadences where I am creating conversations, it's like a flow.

Liz J. Simpson

How am I creating conversations? How am I nurturing relationships? How do I make sure that I'm engaging them enough to get them across the finish line of cutting the check and what I find for so many women in businesses?

Liz J. Simpson

Most are having a version of sales first and foremost. Don't nobody want to sell right. It's like I became an entrepreneur because I'm gonna do website, so I want to teach this thing not because I want to do marketing and I want to sell. You gotta

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

sound to make money.

Liz J. Simpson

You have to and honestly that where I ruffle feathers. As I say. If you don't want to sell, then you have a hobby. You don't have a business because if you study business, the lifeblood of any businesses sales, that is where revenue and profitability comes from. Right. So

Liz J. Simpson

until you have a team, then you are the chief sales officer for your business, right?

Liz J. Simpson

And so with that, because most people have an aversion to sales,

Liz J. Simpson

we can create a lot of negative meaning for things

Liz J. Simpson

that shouldn't have it. I'll say that a different way. So if I already think sales is a bad thing and I call you once and you don't answer the phone

Liz J. Simpson

instead of me thinking, maybe calling once wasn't effective for reaching a corporate executive, I might say nobody wants this. No one's answering their phone. This isn't a good way to do it right. It's like throwing the baby out with the bathwater, or you just

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

believe you're like Who wasn't meant to

Liz J. Simpson

be next?

Liz J. Simpson

They don't want it. Let me find another way to get the business right. So the purpose of Cadence is to give people a flow. So they're like playbooks where I say, Okay, so the first step is Day one, since someone linked in connection requests and maybe a week later,

Liz J. Simpson

send them a gateway offering and a week later, do this so it gives people a process to follow.

Liz J. Simpson

And the goal is typically we see there's a 7 to 11 touches that we have to have with an executive fire before we get a corporate client. So it's How do we make sure that

Liz J. Simpson

if there's 30 different corporate clients that I want to work with, how do I make sure that each of those 30 are getting enough touches and enough nurture from from me in order for me to actually get the result I want? Most business owners don't do that. They call someone here, they send the email there. They connect with so and so here they have a phone call here. I even have people who get opportunities like so and so is interested in a solution list. Help me strategize. Okay, Cool. When they reach out to you 10 days ago. You just let the money sit there for 10 days. It's got cold.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Oh, what?

Liz J. Simpson

I really want this. You don't want this. So, like, just it just helps to make sure that we have timely, timely responses to people.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

I love that. You said you require multiple touches because you can't come in hot on a d m on instagram or linked in because

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

no one wants

Liz J. Simpson

that. You're like they

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

call them the paparazzi. Like the telemarketers on the phone. Nobody wants to engage with you. If you're coming in hot like that. It sounds desperate or feels desperate. So Okay, so once you've kind of gone through that and you figured out this is my cadence for forming relationships with them.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

How do you then move in for the sale?

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Or is that too soon at this point?

Liz J. Simpson

No. I mean, what we find from interviewing corporate executives is the higher up you go, the less of the bs they want. All right, so we're all in the business of people. It's about relationships. But you're going to find that a percentage of the people that you connect with if you're positioned well, like say, for instance,

Liz J. Simpson

my LinkedIn is on point. It is like, extremely clear what I do have testimonials on it. I'm speaking about the status quo of my buyer

Liz J. Simpson

and I connect. Let's say I connect with an executive buyer on LinkedIn.

Liz J. Simpson

One of them might read my LinkedIn profile. In the moment we have our first conversation. They're like, Yeah, yeah, I know what you do. I do my research and we have a problem. I'm talking to you because I need this solution. Let's get to business, right? Or there might be others that I reach out to who are like, Wow, I love the work that you do. I don't have a need for your solution But I love to just, you know, have you in my network. That might be someone I nurture, right, so people are gonna fall in different areas, and executives tend to be cut and dry because they don't have time to waste. Their hair is on fire, right? So, and that's another reason why you need to know what's happening In the world of corporate executives, there's a lot of times high turnover, high pressure. There's a lot of reasons why they're looking for experts like you.

Liz J. Simpson

So once you identify at least that there's an opportunity to have a conversation. The thing about no conversations, no cash. When we're talking about corporate buyers, you have to speak with them. You have to have some type of conversation to get the deal. And so the key where most people

Liz J. Simpson

drop the ball is in what we call discovery conversations.

Liz J. Simpson

Because when they finally have a conversation with an executive, they're concerned about what they need to say, or they're trying to prove themselves or they have, like, blinders on, and they're like trying to sell this thing or they're intimidated so they let the buyer lead the conversation. So you really need to know how to lead a discovery call.

Liz J. Simpson

And the beautiful thing is,

Liz J. Simpson

the freedom comes from. You should really go to a discovery call

Liz J. Simpson

and surrender without being attached to an outcome, and you really should be curious about what's happening with this person. What's happening in the world of their organization, what's happening in their day to day. How can I be a resource? What are their greatest concerns? What does success look like for them and So I always tell my clients, if you're focused on what to say,

Liz J. Simpson

you're doing discovery conversations wrong.

Liz J. Simpson

You should be focused on what to ask. What are all the questions I need to ask? What are the questions that I need answers to? So I can better understand if if we're a good fit for each other, if what they need, I can provide, if their expectations or something that I can meet if their culture alliance with what I'm passionate about, right? So

Liz J. Simpson

if you lead with questions,

Liz J. Simpson

what we find is it helps in two ways. One. People judge your intellect by the quality of the questions that you ask and the reason why most people are concerned about what to say because they want to look good. They want to sound good, right? So, actually, in order to achieve that, the better quality questions you ask. People are like, Oh wow,

Liz J. Simpson

I've never been asked that question before. I never thought of it that way. So then they judge you as having greater intellect,

Liz J. Simpson

and then the other side of that is the emotional side. So scientists have found that when we talk about ourselves, it is the same chemical reaction as an orgasm. So they'll be like, Oh, what's that

Liz J. Simpson

cute look at? You're asking about me. Okay, Something about her. I don't know what it is, but I just feel And so people focus so much on how do I build report, like

Liz J. Simpson

small talk like, How's the weather? And it's like you build a report by listening because in this day and age, human beings are like,

Liz J. Simpson

thirsty to be seen her and understood. And so when you hold space for someone in a discovery call and you're not attached to an outcome and you're asking questions and you ask the question, you actually shut up and listen and then you mirror back for understanding for Okay, so does this mean this? Then that's how you build report. That's how you build trust. And then they have this

Liz J. Simpson

amazing emotional reaction, and they're like, Oh, I like her. She's smart, right? So that's the power of that. And in that conversation, you should be co creating a solution. So in that conversation, the questions and the conversation should be Oh, this is what success looks like.

Liz J. Simpson

How would you prefer to see that shape out. So it's like

Liz J. Simpson

by the time Discovery is done properly, you should know what they want and what they're going to say yes to. And then you move into the proposal phase and the proposal phase should just be. Here's what I heard from you based off of what I heard here, the goals. Here's your objectives. Here's your timeline. And then I've wrapped my head around maybe 2 to 3 ways that I can help you get there,

Liz J. Simpson

including the ways that you would like. So the only question in your proposal process should be Are they going to agree to the terms and conditions? And are they going to be okay with the investment levels that I'm proposing to them? So that's it. And then you close it. So a couple

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

follow ups on the back of that.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

What do sales objections look like when you're working with executives at that level?

Liz J. Simpson

Yeah, So objections are normally questions or hesitation. So, um, you know the things that people are trying to wrap their head around our will this solve my problem, right? Because every organization thinks that they're unique, right? They think that their culture is unique. So they're trying to wrap their head around.

Liz J. Simpson

Will this approach will your approach

Liz J. Simpson

solve our problem? Does it consider what's unique about us? Do I trust you? Can you achieve what you say you're going to achieve? Like it could be individual as well, Right? Because people make decisions based off of what the organization needs, but also what they need, right? So, like, selfishly

Liz J. Simpson

in my role, what am I concerned about in my job, right? And what's at risk for me? Will you make my life easier? You're gonna make this harder. Is there? Are we going to have issues with buying? Like so? There's so many things that could come into play

Liz J. Simpson

the beauty of being unattached an outcome. And this is a learned skill set, right? We have to role play. We have to coach this over time. It takes time to develop the ability to show up to a discovery call and really be unattached to an outcome. But

Liz J. Simpson

when you get to that place,

Liz J. Simpson

you want them to articulate their objectives. You want to hear them because you can't get past something that you don't know exists, right, so you need them to have the space to articulate what their concerns are, and we talk about attaching meaning to things. A lot of times, women will hear an objection, and they're like, Oh,

Liz J. Simpson

I can't get past that That's the worst. If they have an objection, they'll never work with me And it's like, No,

Liz J. Simpson

that's an opportunity to hear what their challenges are, right? So that's just my thought on that. But they vary. You'll hear all different types of them.

Liz J. Simpson

Okay?

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

And then you also mentioned that within the proposal phase, that's when you also need to figure out Are they going to be open or okay and open with my price point? Should you be anchoring that price point earlier in the conversation so that you're not disappointed when you drop the price tag and they're like, Whoa, that's out of our budget. How do you get over that being an

Liz J. Simpson

issue?

Liz J. Simpson

Yes, that will vary tremendously, right, depending on who you work with. So,

Liz J. Simpson

you know, some say, for instance, you're in marketing and you know you're offering a marketing solution to a company that does five million a year, and you know that they're typical marketing budget is 20% like there's some business models where you know already that your position is your positioning and pricing is within the realms of industry standards, right? And so for those people they don't always have to anchor, they just know that's another beauty of corporate clients is

Liz J. Simpson

It's not the same as someone writing the check from their personal pocketbooks like there's there's industry standards in some places, right? But if that is a concern, one of the questions should always be budget. So one of the ways that I posed that question is you know,

Liz J. Simpson

Okay, I'm going to take the next 48 hours and just wrap my head around this conversation and map out a few ways that I think I can that we can help you achieve it

Liz J. Simpson

as I'm mapping this out, are there any heart budgets that I need to be cognizant of to make sure that I stay within them? Right. So if there is a budget, that's the way of me saying Hey, I need to be cognizant of a budget. Are there like hard standards here? Because if not, I'm just going to give you these prices. I got right and not,

Liz J. Simpson

but I necessarily change my prices off of that. But it helps me to know.

Liz J. Simpson

Got it. Okay, so

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

it's one thing to know how and what the flows are in order to get the outcome of big money. But what are some of the processes, or what are some of the systems that you have in place and the tools that you're using to keep yourself organized in order to

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

really show that professional face that's gonna make your your buyer comfortable?

Liz J. Simpson

That's a great question. That's a great question. One of the things is you need to shore up LinkedIn. LinkedIn has to be where you are. There's so many statistics, right? Like 80% of executives turn 84% of executives turn to LinkedIn to make

Liz J. Simpson

buying decisions. We look at 80% of B to B leads come from LinkedIn. So that's where your corporate buyer is going to identify

Liz J. Simpson

who the expert is for the problem they have. So you want to make sure that that positioning is clear on like then

Liz J. Simpson

and you want to treat LinkedIn like a sales page, right? Like if someone goes to my LinkedIn profile you want to make buying as simple as possible. So

Liz J. Simpson

you want to make sure they know your email, how to contact you. What? The next step is what your background is, what your niche is. So all of that should be evident from LinkedIn.

Liz J. Simpson

As far as organizing your behaviors, you need to have something that tracks your activities. I call them income producing activities. So with my clients, there are kpi as we track every week, right? Like so, how many contacts have you reached out to? How many discovery calls have you had? How many proposals have you had? How many deals have you lost or won?

Liz J. Simpson

Because we have to focus on the activities that create results. The biggest thing for women entrepreneurs is time management. You're spending all your time doing all of the things, and none of the things have anything to do with sales. So it's like, Oh, my God, I'm doing all these things. And when I audit your time, I'm like, but none of this is helping us secure a contract.,

Liz J. Simpson

So none of it is important then. So you want something that organizes that and keeps those kpi s top of mind. So like a CRM, I'm a huge fan of pipe drive CRM. It's free for like 30 days, and then it's $15 a month. So it's not as expensive.

Liz J. Simpson

And the beauty of pipe drive is like if I send the email to this person, I can easily, you know, document I sent that email and pipe drive will automatically say, Well, what is the next step? And then you can say, Oh, well, in two days, I'm gonna send them a message and you can just schedule it and it integrates with your calendar.

Liz J. Simpson

So it's a way to make sure you keep the main thing. The main thing, another tool that I love is Sales Navigator.

Liz J. Simpson

So another beautiful part of why I love working with corporate clients is through Sales Navigator. In LinkedIn, you can pretty much find

Liz J. Simpson

just about every executive so I can go into Sales Navigator and say, I am looking for chief information officers for recruiting firms in Texas that average at least a million dollars or more in sales. Navigator will say, Here go all of those executives,

Liz J. Simpson

and then that's an easy way of knowing who I need to gain proximity to

Liz J. Simpson

who I need to strategically built relationships with to make sure again that I'm focused on the main thing.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

We're gonna

Liz J. Simpson

have to listen to that

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

portion again and again because so much right in there. And I think it is important, as you said, to keep the main thing. The main thing that you're not overly focused on things that you could be outsourcing to a virtual assistant and that you are just doing the things that are generating income in your business.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

I love that part. So for anyone who is listening to you now and they're thinking, Liz, you are speaking to my soul. I need to you. I've been selfish. I need that big money. How can they find you? How can they work with

Liz J. Simpson

you?

Liz J. Simpson

Yes, they can find me on lengthen. I know, like a broken record. But you can find me on LinkedIn under Liz J. Simpson. Just connect with me and let me know that you came from the office scripts podcast so I can give. I can give credit where credit is due, but yes, Lincoln is the best place. And I just love to know that you came from the podcast and learn to know what your greatest challenges at that time. That way I know how to help.

Liz J. Simpson

Oh,

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

great. Thank you so

Liz J. Simpson

much. Liz, I really appreciate

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

you coming on the show

Liz J. Simpson

today.

Liz J. Simpson

My pleasure. Thank you so much for having me. Of

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

course.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Hi, Off-Scripters. I'm so glad you made it to the end of this episode. If you enjoy listening to our show, please pay it forward by sharing us with your network. Between episodes you can find me on instagram are handle is at She's Off Script, or you can catch up on past episodes at She's Off Script dot com. See you on the next one.

hey there!

I'm Serwaa, your new business strategist.

I’m a digital business strategy expert, headstrong high achiever, mom of two girls and wife to a strapping African man.

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