Podcast

Episode 115: How To Negotiate Influencer Brand Deals With Steph Onyekwere

Nov 05, 2020

In today’s episode, we meet influencer attorney and expert negotiator, Steph Onyekwere. She helps influencers negotiate brand deals so they don’t leave money on the table.

Steph started her career advising Tech companies in Silicon Valley but then got intrigued by the parallels between her Tech clients and the influencers she was following.

She quickly saw how she could make a bigger impact in the influencer space by teaching influencers how to navigate the contracts brands were giving them.

If you are new to negotiating influencer deals and partnerships listen up because Steph is giving us a behind the scenes view into how we should be negotiating.

Listen on Apple Podcasts

You’ll learn about:

  • Key phrases to look for in a legal agreement
  • Common negotiation tactics brands use
  • How to address brands trying to use your content for free
  • How to set your rates

Mentioned in this episode:


Episode Transcript

Stephanie Onyekwere

If you want these to be included in agreement, you're gonna have to pay for it. And that's typically where a lot of influencers miss out on either getting more money. Or they put themselves in a position where they're giving away ownership of their content or giving away really broad licenses for their content. And they weren't compensated for that. And I p is important. And you don't just give away ownership of your I P, which is intellectual property. So that's your photos. That could be your videos. That could be your blog's those air big things they're asking for. So it's just shocking how easily and quickly they put those in agreements and expect winters to just sign them away.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

I Off-Scripters It's your host, Serwaa Adjei-Pellé and welcome to Episode 1 15 of the She's Off Script podcast. This'll is a show where we hear and learn from women who faded unique blueprints for success. My hope is that you'll hear their stories and translate their gems into a unique path for yourself.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

In today's episode, we meet influencer attorney and expert negotiator Stephanie Yonekura. Steph started her career advising tech companies in Silicon Valley, but then got intrigued by the parallels between her tech clients and the influencers she was following. She quickly saw how she could make a bigger impact in the influencer space, where she saw many women leaving money on the table because they weren't negotiating the deals brands were offering them. If you're new to negotiating influencer deals and partnerships, listen up because Steph is giving us behind the scenes view into how we should be negotiating before we hear the rest of Steph story. I would love it if you could subscribe, rate and review our show on iTunes. This'll help to spread the word about our podcast so amazing stories like Staffs and continue to inspire women looking to launch their own Off-Scripters. Ernie's with that. Let's go off script with the CEO of advised by Steph Stephanie on you, Gray

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Stephanie on your career. Welcome to She's Off Script. Thank you for being here.

Stephanie Onyekwere

Hi. Thanks for having me.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

So for any of our listeners who haven't heard of you, could you share who you are and what you do?

Stephanie Onyekwere

Yes, of course. Hi, everyone. I'm Steph. I am the founder of Advice by Steph LLC. And I help influencers negotiate brand deals and understand the Brando contracts.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

So I know you started your career advising tech clients in Silicon Valley. Why the transition into the influencer space?

Stephanie Onyekwere

Well, when I was working with tech companies in Silicon Valley, I'm a lawyer. I don't even know if I said that at the beginning that I am a lawyer and I loved being in Silicon Valley because you're working with a lot of startups. I started seeing a lot of influencers. Just the industry started booming a lot more. I'm not really sure how it just came about. But I started really noticing influencers, and I realized that influences air like little businesses in themselves and their almost very similar to start ups except a lot of influencer. It's not really recognizing or seeing themselves as a business, and I just really loved that There were so many women and so many women of color, you know, being in the influencer space and, you know, being in Silicon Valley, that's not that's not really the people you're around and the people you see. So I it was just a better fit for me than you know, working with um, the companies and in the Silicon Valley tech companies.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

So how did you come up to speed in the industry or on the industry?

Stephanie Onyekwere

It was hard. I basically had to, you know, learn as if I waas an influencer. I thought I could just, you know, I'm like, I'm a lawyer, you know, They they're doing contracts. They know they need me because, like, they know they need a lawyer. But that was definitely not the case. And I definitely had a reality check very early on about Yeah, influences really trusting and wanting to know, You know, Have you been a similar struggle of the influence the world? Do you know the journey? Do you know? You know what the work is behind it. And so I actually started off with my dog. I have, ah, golden Doodle. He's £80 and it's a lot of attention

Stephanie Onyekwere

just giving him walks. And so I created an instagram for him just to really get an understanding of you know what it takes to create content? What it takes thio be a part of the influence or industry. And then from there I started reading, you know, research. Well, maybe that's the lawyer in me just started reading, watching a lot of blobs are listening to a lot of podcast watching and reading a lot of blog's and following a lot of other influencers and just really

Stephanie Onyekwere

focusing full on on like what it really takes. What is this job? These influences air doing what is in this industry and just, you know, asking around and really helped me catch up to speed because so many influencers provides so much information out there. And so just doing a little digging a lot.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

How long did that process take for you?

Stephanie Onyekwere

It was probably.

Stephanie Onyekwere

I created my dogs instagram and maybe had his for, like, six months a year. I was also, you know, still working at a law firm. So that was kind of something I was doing just as like, a break. It was fun getting out, got me outside, got me going and doing things. And then, really probably about like like, six months. It took me from like listening to everybody's podcast about that. Anything to do with influencers. I started from Episode one just as I was driving and commuting in the Bay Area. Anything I was doing, I was listening to a podcast about how to be a I was reading something about how to be an influencer. I was like scrolling all the way down to influence or countenancing. What did they do with, like, what was it like? I was really digging in like a research project. It was probably about like, four months of doing all that and then finally putting myself out there and reaching out influencers and and, you know, asking them like, Oh, who's reviewing your contracts? Do you need some help? And kind of having a lot of support from influencers who saw me coming in in the early stages and really wanting to work with me and help me grow. So yeah, it took about 4 to 6 months to really understand what it takes to be an influencer. And then it took putting myself out there and creating a platform for myself, which I did not want to dio. I did not see myself as a content creator. I did not want that was like, oh picture than myself all the time, but it was actually became very enjoyable and like I came so much better at taking photos of myself and, you know, Coben kind of forced me. Thio really don't, like, really get into my cont. Um,

Stephanie Onyekwere

So it's still on this journey of understanding, influences and understanding the industry and how brands t influences as well, you

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

know, it is definitely a change in perspective, just like you said, because when you're in house working for someone else, everything is inbound to you. You're given the assignment, the clients come to you. But now, when you are the business owner, you have to go out there and get the client. You have to be out there and marketing yourself. So when you first started to reach out to influencers, how did they receive you? Because they didn't know who you were. They didn't know what you could do. And then when you hear lawyer, you think thinking dollar signs, right? So how how were you able to navigate that? Where you reviewing contracts for free

Stephanie Onyekwere

at first? Yes, a lot of it was freed. A little work are freaking little money at first, and when I like I was saying a little earlier, like I came in like you know, of course they know why they keep me they're reviewing contracts. And, you know, I had calls with influencers, and they're like, Well, how many followers do you have? And how long have you been taking photos? And

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

I'm

Stephanie Onyekwere

like, What? A lawyer. What are you talking about? I don't think followers of your podcast, but they're like, you understand? Like what I'm doing And it really just, you know, that really caught me off guard about, like, understanding what? You know. I needed to understand them a lot more. And they wanted me to not just be a lawyer, but to really, you know, be in their industry, be in the influence or industry. And so I did work with influencers or free or very low, maybe for, like, a percentage of the brand deals. And I started off pitching and negotiating deals, which I learned very quickly is not for me on the pitching. Besides, what

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

were you pitching for your dog or for yourself?

Stephanie Onyekwere

Oh, for for the other influencers? I was pitching their Brando's.

Stephanie Onyekwere

That sounds

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

like above and beyond for a lawyer.

Stephanie Onyekwere

Absolutely. Okay, Tony, my absolutely Because a lot of influences out there when I was realizing is that there

Stephanie Onyekwere

not only do they want you to negotiate for them? But they're also struggling on one end to just, you know, get more brand ALS, you know, coming in their doors. That's what I learned that somebody else's job. That's something that you have to understand when you're operating a business and when you're starting your own business is something and somebody else's job, your job,

Stephanie Onyekwere

the learning curve and I did work with the couple influencers. I was pitching deals for them, responding to bills for them and negotiating their deals. And that's where I kind of got my foot in the door and really getting to see how brands treat influencers and getting to see the brand contracts. And really seeing what influencers are are not doing when it comes to, you know, advocating for himself, negotiating your deals and really getting to have conversations with with influencers about, you know, how do you usually if I wasn't here, how would you usually do it? And it's just like I wouldn't even review the contract. I would just sign it as long as they,

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

you know, agree

Stephanie Onyekwere

too often. Too often have Thio happen where

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

that's like adult ing 101 always read

Stephanie Onyekwere

the contract contract. Always review them. But you know, a lot of times I think they're the way brand

Stephanie Onyekwere

three influencers especially, you know, if I was talking to them and before they knew I was a lawyer. It's just, you know, kind of like belittling them. Anything you say like No, don't worry about it. And so I really got to see the other side, and it helped me be able to, you know, provide what I realized influencers needed was a lot of education on the importance of your belief. Before you get toe working with me before you get to even paying me, you need to understand by you. And that's where a lot of my content comes from. On Instagram is really educating influences on the importance of reviewing your contracts, the liabilities of not reviewing your contracts and how you can potentially be missing out on you know, additional money. If you're not reviewing your brand contracts and negotiating those disagreements,

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

so walk us through. What a brand negotiation or a deal? Negotiation looks like once you enter the scene.

Stephanie Onyekwere

Mhm well, usually how it starts because a lot of influences to struggle with having the confidence to ask for ah, lot of money. You know, once you get out of the hundreds of dollars and you're getting to the thousands of dollars, even with high number of falling, I worked with influencer who has, you know, over 200,000 followers. And she still has, you know, some no confidence issues around saying I went to $1000 before that. Before that content, I went $20,000

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

and I definitely wanna talk about the lack of transparency around pricing. But I'll let you finish with walking us through the negotiation.

Stephanie Onyekwere

Absolutely. And S.E.O. Usually influencers like to bring me in to help negotiate the rates to so very early on in the beginning. And, you know, we're just kind of talking about, which is kind of weird toe for me, at least, to talk about how much I'm somebody is going to pay pay. You were not when you haven't even seen the agreement haven't seen like, you know the additional stuff. They may ask for it, which is typically in the agreement, and so usually it's an emails and you're going back and forth based on the delivery bols. They're asking before. So the pieces of content they want you to create and how much they have to pay for that after you kind of get to a number there. There's a second level of when they send you over their contract, which is typically a form that probably a law firm has drafted for them or some lawyers drafted for them. And it has all these provisions, all these obligations, all these restrictions that nobody has discussed and nobody has heard about. It has exclusivity in there as these broad licenses it. Sometimes it has ownership, um, rights to the brand that nobody has discussed, and nor has it been toe into consideration when you know, giving the rate. And so from there there's another negotiation about. If you want these to be included in agreement, you're gonna have to pay for it. And that's typically where a lot of influencers miss out on either getting more money or they, you know, put themselves in a position where they're giving away ownership of their content or giving away really broad licenses for their content. And they weren't competent compensated for that. And any company knows I P is important, you know, to your business. And you don't just give away ownership of your pipe, which is intellectual property. So that's your you know, that could be your photos. That could be your videos. That could be your blog's. You know that I'll be considered type, and any company knows those air big things they're asking for. So it's just shocking how easily and quickly they put those in agreements and expect once is to just sign them away.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Oh, so kind of back to the point of

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

the lack of transparency within this industry. It's the pricing is not very standardized. So what is the best way for a new influencer to get inside into the rate so that they don't get lowballed?

Stephanie Onyekwere

I think the best way is to really get into a lot of influence or communities because a lot of times you know, you're looking on. What people do is they do a quick Google search or something like that to try to figure out their rate. And there's these calculators that just I don't know if they're created by brands, but they're just really undervaluing,

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

really

Stephanie Onyekwere

answer on like what? What they do, and I think most of the time it's because they're only looking at a small portion of what an influencer provides, which is their audience members. And they're not taking into consideration the contact mitigation side, which is like the time it

Stephanie Onyekwere

sources it takes to create this content. And you should also be compensated for and should be taken into consideration when, right, So that sounds really good to get into some of these programs. But also you have to sit down for yourself and figure out how much do I want to get paid? You have to ask for it. So you may. Maybe you may say, I want to get paid, you know, 100 not how much do this. Will the brand pay you how much you personally want to get paid? Don't take that into consideration yet, and when you get to that number, ask for it. Just keep asking for it. That's what it takes to.

Stephanie Onyekwere

That's what it takes to get your time. You usually have a number in mind. When you goto a job and you're applying for a job, you have some random number in mind. Maybe it's because you know, maybe we paid that before or something like that. But you need to kind of assess SS for yourself. How much for all this time to create this video? How much do I need a brand to pay me to create it specifically for them? And then just keep asking for it just asking for. And if they don't want to pay you that, then it's not worth your time. And you didn't miss out.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

That's the clarity you need to be able to walk away because you don't wanna be working for pennies or losing money when you're working so earlier. You also mentioned licensing, and I know that's one revenue stream for influencers. So could you walk us through? What does that mean? Toe license, your content? And how much could we get for licensing our content?

Stephanie Onyekwere

Yeah, well, licensing is basically giving somebody permission to use your content. So typically, when you're creating content, you are the owner of that content and you have certain rights to it. One of its ability to publicly display it toe, you know, commercialized it. Any of that stuff for another person to be able to do is your content they need a license or some permission to be able to do that, whether it's for posting it on INSTAGRAM posting on, they're putting it on their website, anything like that. So for influencers,

Stephanie Onyekwere

what typically happens is that a brand will reach out to them, whether it's for a brand ill or whether it's for just kind of. Sometimes they just put it in a comments like Put, I agree. Um, if I can use your picture E comptel, anything's influencers, I'm talking about this a lot. Just don't put. I agree. Don't because

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

what are you agreeing to?

Stephanie Onyekwere

Exactly? Exactly. And I've seen sometimes they do include, like a little link where you have to copy and paste it and take that extra step and look at the link that you're agreeing. Thio and it's horrible. It's a very broad, broad, broad license, and it's just not very favorable to you. And and it just doesn't make sense. If you literally are not building any type of relationship, your you know, the brand typically doesn't have any obligation to give you any credit. S.E.O just not very favorable to you.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

So maybe let's take a little a little detour here. What should be our response? If we do want to build a relationship with the brand when they say enter hashtag, blah, blah, blah. What should we do?

Stephanie Onyekwere

What you should do is you know d m that influence our d m that brand and you know, let them know that you would love You know, you appreciate that they like your content. You would love to partner with them or to work with um and, you know, and then try to pitch a deal from them. There may be asked them for an email contact of like their influencer relations influencer marketing person and trying to get a contact that way. What you're really trying to do is take it off like instagram or social media and get it into email. So if the best thing you could do from that

Stephanie Onyekwere

from that post, that post that they send for that comment that they send over is get a contact from that those contacts are very valuable and you get like, direct access to the person in charge of potentially giving you a brand deal. But typically it Z, they send that to a lot of people if you tag a brand, they send that out to a lot of people, so they're unwilling to negotiate, and they're unwilling to pay for it. But you may be able to get like, a contact information for that and pitch bill to that person and then get something better from there

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

because you are right influencers or leaving a lot of money on the table because I follow an influencer who's doing very well. And I know they had gotten a licensing deal with a specific media company for photos, and that same media company featured someone I know who's a smaller influence. And I said, Oh, you got a licensing deal? She was like, No, she just she said. I tagged them and they used my image. And so what happens then? If even without permission, just because you use a specific hashtag a brand uses your photo. What's your recourse? What should you? How should you approach them in a way that you can still, um, nurture relationship with them?

Stephanie Onyekwere

I think the best way to do it is when you see that your photos are being used, especially, I mean, if you put I agree, you agree to it. So there's not much you can dio other than saying you wanna you know, reaching back out to them and saying

Stephanie Onyekwere

you know more content for them. But whenever you see a brand reaching out to your content, I personally think that you should just, you know, reach out to them and let them know that for use your content, you have a license 60 and you would love, you know, and

Stephanie Onyekwere

we're asking for them to pay that, I think and feet. But you would love to be ableto create content for them on a paid basis and just really, you know, by using your content, it shows that they like what you're creating for them and they somewhat no, it's probably very rare that they don't know they're not supposed to be doing that. It's just the risk is very low for them because a lot of influences allow them to do that, and they can get away with it. And then if somebody says something, they'll just take it down. But I think you should take a very strong stance to that and let them know and go ahead and send them your invoice for that licensing fee, but also do it in a very kind way and say you would love to partner with them. Or you would love to, you know, work on a collaboration with them so that they could use your content gonna pick basis. But I definitely don't think you should just, you know, allow and a brand to use your content and hope for, you know, to gain followers for that from that or hope that they reach out to you in the future to create something for you already got it for free. They don't need like they probably don't feel like any, you know, any obligation to pay you because they just took it without paying you in the first place. Rather And if you want it. But it did something like that. The brand they absolutely would not let you get away with. That s Oh, definitely

Stephanie Onyekwere

think of your your content and your photos as very valuable things to your company, To your business as an influencer. And you've got to protect it. You gotta You gotta go after the people that are using it. You know, companies, bigger companies do it all the time they have teams to do it. Although your smaller company, it's still your responsibility to make sure that people hate you, um, to eat your content and you don't miss out. Like you said, you're not leaving on the table.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

So what are some commonly misunderstood terms in agreements that you think

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

these air terms that influences need to take note of the next time they're looking at a contract? Because my assumption is most influencers don't have an attorney in their corner. They're just reviewing it themselves because, quite frankly, they're not getting that much proposed earlier on. So what should we be focused on in those agreements

Stephanie Onyekwere

in your agreements? I mean, I think there are big things that you should watch out for in a lot of influencers. Try to at least, and it comes to the licensing provisions and the exclusivity obligations because those are typically in your agreement. I think when it comes to your licenses,

Stephanie Onyekwere

a lot of times you look toe one place to find that license, and you're just trying to look for, you know, like I'm granting or I hereby maybe some specific language that you picked up but a lot of times agreements is not that simple. You have to look at the whole entire agreement because there is many times where brand stick multiple licenses in an agreement. And so you may pick out, fix up one license, and you don't actually realize that, like you also have additional license grants, maybe from bad drafting. Maybe they are trying to be a little sneaky, you know, you never really know. And so really looking at those licenses and seeing exactly what they're saying. And so whatever in a brand reaches out to you

Stephanie Onyekwere

and there may be asking you, we need this license for this campaign. They should not have a perpetual license in their perpetual means forever. One word can completely changes the whole entire license. They don't need a perpetual license. It's for a three month period to period, you know, like it's something very small, so making sure you pay attention to exactly what you're granting. And then when it comes to exclusivity, a lot of people look for the word exclusivity, but it doesn't have to say exclusivity for there to be restrictions on

Stephanie Onyekwere

you can work with. Maybe it says something about a non competent competition. They are non compete. Maybe it just says something about you know you you are unable to, you know, work with. You know, this and this brand, all of that counts as being an exclusive provisioned, and they don't They may not. It may not be favorable to them to put a big heading that says exclusivity. So really paying attention to what it actually means. What are they restricting you and your business from doing? Are they restricting you from working with another brand? Are they restricting you from being able toe to for you personally to get into a new industry? Because I know a lot of times influencers, you know, you're tryingto

Stephanie Onyekwere

maybe you want to create a lipstick you want to create, um, in branch out some of your you know your business a little bit. Well, if you have a non competition agreement which says that you also cannot compete with the brand that you signed and maybe it last lot and you know extends outside of determination or the expiration of your agreement and then you create a lipstick with that beautiful in that beauty brand comes after you because you're not supposed to be creating something like that. Little things like

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

because you're competing with them. That makes sense.

Stephanie Onyekwere

Gosh,

Stephanie Onyekwere

and some of these terms, they do, you know, survive or extend beyond the term of the agreement, so you may have a three month agreement. But there is a provision in there that says, like, you know, provision 36 and nine and one of that. One of those provisions is the non competition agreement. And that may extend, you know, pass termination of the agreement. And that makes them, you know, the five years past the terms to. So you forget about five years. But

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

given all these Heidi holes, what called them they have within the agreement, would it be better if the influencer gives them an agreement and then kind of adds the list of record of What is it called the list of deliverables as an addendum?

Stephanie Onyekwere

Absolutely, absolutely. It's it typically is it Z? It can be harder for the influence to do that, because one you have to have, you know you have to have a contract. So having that prepared and I know a lot of influencers don't have a contract on them. But also you have to have the confit

Stephanie Onyekwere

to say, Hey, let's use my agreement. I prefer to use my agreement. It's my policy to my agreement and try going from there Sometimes it won't work, but a lot of times it will. And it does help you out because you know what's in this contract. You know, there's no little secrets in there, you know? Exactly. You know, you know how it works. And like you said, you can attach on a schedule and you can change it up. And it really does help you out with having to go back and forth and find a little holes and the wordings that they're placing in there because those agreements that were drafted for the brand is very one sided. Very one sided is so favorable to brand, and it it takes a lot. Some agreements. I look at him like I don't even know what this means. Like this is like who wrote this? Like what? What are they trying to do here? This is so over complicated and so extreme. And, you know, it just makes it even more costly to the influencer because now you're having to pay a lawyer or somebody else to repeat your contracts for them. Your feet needs Thio

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

at that point

Stephanie Onyekwere

as well.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

So now that everyone has heard what you do and the value you could bring to their careers as influencers,

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

I think the big concern with people starting out is the cost. So earlier you had mentioned that you started out working for a percentage of the deal. Is that still how you're operating

Stephanie Onyekwere

most of time for me? I I love, you know, one on one helping influencers. But I think a lot of times my cost cost thio to negotiate a Brando can be expensive. So I definitely understand that there are some people and sometimes I'm a dio a percentage. But for the most time, I do just a flat fee. Just so you know, you know how much the rate is. And then I know like how much we're getting out of here, and there's just no confusion at that. But what I really think a lot of influencers, um,

Stephanie Onyekwere

like influencers need because a lot of times you can't bring somebody in a can and can't bring somebody in on dso a lot of times. What influences need is just a lot of support and education on how to go about negotiating Randalls. And so that's why I started. You know, I started writing the playbook and creating playbook and talk about a little about how to negotiate. Brando's like a lawyer, and that's something that kind of walks influencer, step by step, guides them and how you can go about reviewing your own Brando contracts until you can maybe get to a point where you can afford to put someone like on a retainer or afford to put somebody, um, to pay somebody hurt each contract because some of these contracts, they're gifted contracts. Some of the times you're starting off and you're like, Oh, my gosh, I pay your rate. I get like, you know so little from that. So some of the times it it may when you're starting out, you may, you know, want to your contract signed off on your own, but still have the education, the backing of the confidence on your by yourself. Until that's what I'm hoping to also provide influence.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Absolutely. So now you have, I believe, a course coming out as well. So could you tell us how that factored into the evolution of the business you're building?

Stephanie Onyekwere

Yes. When I you know, I talked to a lot of influencers and it was it was kind of a conversation about rate and price, and especially during the period of Kobe, I think that's probably where it came from. A lot of brands were, um we're well, a lot of brands were using provisions in agreements it helped in multiple ways. So a lot of brands were using provisions in agreements to get out of working with influencers, which became problematic. The force majeure. If you recall that provision, the provision where, like extreme circumstances, happen Um, you're it was an issue for a lot of companies. If you're familiar listening, are familiar with that provision was an issue for a lot of companies either getting out of contracts or trying to which books, country And so um, influencer started during this covert period about the importance of reviewing your contracts and getting them, but also because brand deals were holding back on deals and not being very consistent. You know, having somebody on retainer was just a lot more difficult, and so I understood as influences. You still need the help help like you still need to understand how to go about it. And maybe sometimes you just kind of want to do it yourself for the smaller deals. So during the period of Kobe, I created, of course, how to negotiate Brando's like lawyer like a lawyer, and it really does just educate you on, you know, the starting place of battery drone contract. What each provision means has a dictionary in there for, like, most of the terms that I've ever heard of when negotiating a brand ill all there for you. So you can come and put yourself in a better position to negotiate your own deals and so that yes, maybe if it's not consistent for you yet, and you can't say every month I'm landing five K, I'm landing 20 k. I'm landing 50 k. You have the resource is with you to kind of do those one off deals by yourself until you get to a point where you're like I just don't have the time to negotiate the deals. I need somebody, and then that's where I come in to kind of take that off your plate a little bit.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Oh, I love that. I've heard so many amazing stories of how people have been able to pivot and adjust their business just to the times we're operating in. And that sounds like a great way to at least capture the part of the of the influence of market. That's just still trying to figure things out. And they don't want to give you their whole paycheck.

Stephanie Onyekwere

Exactly. E. I quickly learned that it's sometimes it's not that the influencers don't know they need. It is just that you know the cost. Maybe a lot for anybody starting out as a business, Andi, especially for influencers who, where there's a lot of there's a huge learning curve at the beginning. So, um, definitely happy to this course and give this playbook out to influencers and so that they can, you know, do something and advocate for themselves to negotiate from, or and they don't walk away from so many deals. Could I get I hear that from so many influences, so many deals where they're like, Oh my gosh, I'm so excited I could blah, blah blah and then at the end of it, they're not happy and they're pissed off because they wouldn't pay them how much they wanted Thio. They agree to a rate that they didn't like and they did all this work, but the hopes of working for this brand again, and then nothing ever came from it. And now they have these huge, like exclusivity provision of this broad license. And the Brandis doesn't even need to come back because they basically own your content. And they kind of on you at that point when you have, like, a 12 month exclusivity and you only created one story or one post for them. So little things like that that really have started irritating influencers. And I think they've had

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Oh, so for now, anyone who is eager to get into your course or maybe consult with you, how can they find you?

Stephanie Onyekwere

They can find me in two ways. I'm always on instagram, so you could just find me advised by Steph, or you could go to my website. And then that's where you can purchase the course. And you can also, you know, schedule call to talk to me and see how we can best work together. And that's advised by Steph dot com.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Well, this was such a jam packed episode. I really appreciate it, and I think this is such a timely conversation, because the need for influencers is on the rise. But it's important that they're very highly informed before they get stuck into a deal that they don't like or they don't want.

Stephanie Onyekwere

Absolutely, absolutely. And the influencer industry and influencer marketing is still growing. So if that's something that you're questioning, if you should get into get into it now, before you're looking at it 10 years from now and your friends are making millions, get into it now.

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

Absolutely. I appreciate it. Thank you. Thank

Stephanie Onyekwere

you. It's so great to

Serwaa Adjei-Pellé

be here. Hi, Off-Scripters. I'm so glad you made it to the end of this episode. If you enjoy listening to our show, please pay it forward by sharing us with your network. Between episodes, you can find me on instagram. Our handle is at She's Off Script or you can catch up on past episodes at She's Off Script dot com. See you on the next one

hey there!

I'm Serwaa, your new business strategist.

I’m a digital business strategy expert, headstrong high achiever, mom of two girls and wife to a strapping African man.

Embracing these facets of my life has been the key to breaking through my plateaus!

Every Expert Needs a Personal Brand. Not Sure Where To Start?

Steal my playbook! In the age of social media, it’s not enough to expect your product or service to speak for itself. Whether you’re a corporate queen, side hustler or entrepreneur, you need a brand that creates trust with your audience.